Workshops

EGO provides opportunities for several professional development workshops throughout the year for students. Workshops may include:

Sid Dobrin’s Job Talk
One of our professor’s best talks, recorded and transcribed by EGO alum Andee Krafft. Audio & Transcribed. (Webmaster is working on attaching a downloadable file of notes.)

Job Searching in Academia
We will walk you through the whole process of job searches from credentialing through job applications, interviews, and offers. This workshop will be as useful to new graduate students in getting a grasp of what processes lay ahead of them as it would be for those graduate students soon to enter the market. All years welcome.

Publishing Workshop
This workshop will examine the publishing process and cover several topics concerning the world of scholarly publishing. Topics include: how to select journals to publish in; writing a structured abstract, tips on writing the paper, impact factors. All years (and questions) welcome.

State-of-the-Field Lunch Series
Each lunch will be focused on a different area of study, and professors from that field will discuss current trends, particular journals to read and submit to, conferences to attend, and other important professional issues.

Teaching Tips for Literature Courses
This workshop is for all English graduate students who are interested in learning and asking questions about teaching strategies for teaching and building assignments. General topics—applying to AML, Brit and Film classes—may include: building syllabi, choosing a reading list, creating assignments, generating class discussion, and pedagogical practices, among others. Topics may change depending on the needs of the workshop participants. All years and levels of experience welcome. Bring any and all of your questions, ideas, and concerns.

Teaching Workshop 1
Get tips on integrating technology into your course. This workshop will especially interest instructors who currently or would like to use web sites, blogs, discussion forums, etc. (in addition to/beyond e-learning and simple “syllabus-in-HTML” pages). Topics will be tailored to the needs of the workshop participants. This workshop is a great place to bounce ideas off others and get advice from others who have been there. Bring any and all of your questions, ideas, and concerns!

Teaching Workshop 2
This workshop is for English graduate students who are interested in learning and asking questions about teaching strategies for teaching and building assignments. General topics—applying to AML, Brit and Film classes—may include: building syllabi, choosing a reading list, creating assignments, and pedagogical practices, among others. Topics may change depending on the needs of the workshop participants. All years and levels of experience welcome. Bring any and all of your questions, ideas, and concerns!

Teaching Workshop 3
This workshop will highlight teaching strategies for teaching American and British literature as well as film. We will go over some of the department requirements, such as how to approach AML 2070 versus AML 2410, and will discuss any other areas of concern, such as in-class assignments versus formal paper assignments; whether or not to give a final exam; what texts to choose; and techniques regarding class discussions. We welcome anyone with experience to come and contribute, and those without any literature-teaching experience to ask any questions they may have. We can also go over issues for teaching upper-division if need be.

Teaching Workshop 4
This workshop is for English graduate students who are interested in learning and asking questions about teaching strategies for teaching with a focus on building assignments. General topics—applying to AML, Brit and Film classes—may include: building syllabi, choosing a reading list, creating assignments, (types, major/minor, critical/creative/hybrid) and pedagogical practices, among others. Topics may change depending on the needs of the workshop participants. All years and levels of experience welcome. Bring any and all of your questions, ideas, and concerns!

Teaching Workshop 5
This workshop is for English graduate students who are interested in learning and asking questions about teaching strategies for teaching American Literature. More to the point, this workshop will model how an American Literature course might address a special topic, specific theme, or particular period. We will model “special topics” by way of “regionalisms” in twentieth-century American studies. This workshop, therefore, will focus on selecting reading lists (what kinds of texts work, what kinds don’t), introducing theory as part of a pedagogical toolkit (how to contextualize syllabus readings in a larger academic discourse), and teasing out the way in which literature might open-up to larger historical narratives (how the assigned texts might interrogate larger political, cultural, and social movements)

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